Grand Gilded Sphinx Statue Atop a Egyptian Plinth
Grand Gilded Sphinx Statue atop a Egyptian Plinth

The Spirit of Tutankhamen: Egyptian Oval Mirror Wall Sculpture
The Spirit of Tutankhamen: Egyptian Oval Mirror Wall Sculpture

Egyptian Torch Offering Table Lamp - Set of Two
Egyptian Torch Offering Table Lamp - Set of Two

Temple of Luxor: Grand-Scale Egyptian Urn Statue
Temple of Luxor: Grand-Scale Egyptian Urn Statue

Wings of Isis Egyptian Revival Sculptural ClockTemple of Luxor: Grand-Scale Egyptian Urn Statue

Manetho

Manetho composed the "Aegyptiaca" (History of Egypt) in which he divided the rulers into dynasties (or ruling families) which makes the footing of the modern organization of dating Ancient Egypt. We do not live his clean Egyptian name but it is much indicated that the name Manetho comes from the titles "beloved of Thoth" "Truth of Thoth" or "Gift of Thoth" (although "Beloved of Neith" or "Lover of Neith" are besides hinted along with the footing of "groom/horseherd" and the phrase "I have witnessed Thoth"). The earliest reference to his name is in the processes of Josephus Flavius in which he is named Manethon.

It is loosely agreed that was born in Sebennytos (in the Delta) in the 3rd Century B.C. and was a Graeco-Egyptian priest in the Temple of Ra Heliopolis durting the resign of Ptolemy I Soter and/or Ptolemy II Philadelphus. He had access to some sources which no longer exist (such as temple records), but likewise included legends and fanciful stories. As a result, you have to have some of his levels with a pinch of salt.

No full copies of Manetho's text rest, we only have short departments of text and a few characters in the writings of Josephus Flavius (basic century A.D.), Sextus Julius Africanus (third century A.D.), Eusebius of Cesarea (3rd/4rth century A.D) and George Syncellos (a Byzantine historian from the 8th century A.D). None of these textbooks are contemporary, and his writings were used and abused by scholars in a long running contention between proponents of Egyptian, Jewish and Greek histories tough over which civilization was the best and the oldest. As a result, our noesis of his original text is limited, and coloured by the feeling of the authors who concerned to him.

Recent Posts:

·        Achillas
·        Viceroy of Kush
·        The House of Life
·        Mandet
·        Kafr Hassan Dawood
·        Nebertcher
·        Neberu
·        Achoris (Hakor)
·        Actium
·        Kemanub

Kemanub

Kemanub, or Kemanweb, was a royal woman of the Twelfth Dynasty She  was credibly  the consort of Amenemhet II (1929-1892 B.C.E.). Kemanub was forgotten in Amenemhet II's mortuary temple  at  Dashur, entombed  in  the  main social system  there. Her coffin was a  single  proboscis  of  a  tree, dug out and inscribed.

Recent Posts:


·        Viceroy of Kush
·        The House of Life
·        Mandet
·        Kafr Hassan Dawood
·        Nebertcher
·        Neberu
·        Achoris (Hakor)
·        Actium

Actium

Actium was a  promontory  on  the  western  coast  of Greece at the entrance to the Ambracian Gulf is where a decisive battle for ensure of Egypt and the Roman empire occurred  in  31  B.C.E. Octavian,  the  future  Augustus, met  Marc  Antony and Cleopatra VII (5130  B.C.E.) at Actium.  Antony  was  encamped on  the  place,  and  the  naval battle  that  took  set  outside  of  the  gulf  allowed  the name for the battle. Octavians 400 ships frustrated the 500 vases of Marc Antony and Cleopatra VII, and they flied to Alexandria. Antony  gave  suicide  right  of Alexandria, and Cleopatra VII, facing immurement and humiliation,  downed  herself  when  the  Roman  forces  started residence  in  the  city  soon  afterwards  the  battle.  Octavian (Emperor Augustus) pioneered an Olympic-style serial of games at Actium to remember his triumph there.

Recent Posts:


·        Tjebu (Qaw El Kebir)
·        Nebenteru
·        Achillas
·        Viceroy of Kush
·        The House of Life
·        Mandet
·        Kafr Hassan Dawood
·        Nebertcher
·        Neberu
·        Achoris (Hakor)