God Heka

God Heka
God Heka was the exaltation of magic in Egyptian  mythology,  his  name "Heka" being  the  Egyptian  word  for  "magic". Fitting to Egyptian writing  Heka was "before dichotomy  had  yet  come  into  being."  The  term  "Heka"  was  likewise  used  for  the practice of magical ritual. The Coptic word "hik" is derived from the Ancient Egyptian. Heka literally means responsible the Ka, the view of the soul which embodied personality. Egyptians thought responsible the power of the person was how magic worked.  "Heka"  also  involved  great  power  and  influence,  particularly  in  the case of ranging upon the Ka of the gods. Heka acted together with Hu, the principle of divine utterance, and Sia, the conception of divine omniscience, to create the ground of plastic power both in the individual world and the world of the deities.

As the one who triggers Ka, Heka was besides said to be the son of Atum, the creator of things in widespread, or now and then the son of Khnum, who created special individual Ba (another view of the soul). As the son of Khnum, his mother was very to be Menhit.

The  hieroglyph  for  his  name  featured  a  twist  of  flax  inside  a  couple  of  mounted arms;  however,  it  also  mistily  resembles  a  pair  of  intertwined  snakes  within someone's arms. Consequently, Heka was said to have combated and conquered two serpents, and was usually represented as a man dying two giant intertwined snakes. Medicine and doctors were considered to be a form of magic, and so Heka's priesthood performed these bodily functions.

Egyptians believed that with Heka, the activating of the Ka, an view of the soul of both gods and humans, (and divine  personification  of  magic),  they  could  mold  the  gods  and  gain  shelter,  healing  and  transmutation. Health and haleness of being were worthy to Heka. There is no word for religion in the ancient Egyptian language, material and religious world views were not distinct; thus Heka was not a secular practice but rather a divine observance. Every face of life, every word, plant, animal and ritual was connected to the power and agency of the gods.