God Min

God Min
God Min was Egyptian early fertility deity, Min was fast for the fecundity of the subjects and animals in  ancient  Egypt.  The  earliest  house  for  Min  was  a fetish, an object believed to have magical belongings and  that  resembled  a  door  bolt.  But  later  Min  was was  as  a  partially  mummiform  see  who holds his set member, a symbol of fertility, with his left hand patch his right hand holds a increased flail to smite his foes. Min bears a flat crown with two tall plumes and wafts hanging down. From the Old Kingdom (2686-2181 b.c.) on, he was connected with long-leafed lettuce, which usually was found on his extending table. The Pyramid Texts name to Min as he Whose Arm is Increased in the East. Mins cult central was at Koptos, and excavations at the temple website  have  got  three  colossal statues engraved in limestone that may be the early sculptures of the  deity.

In the Middle Kingdom (2055-1650  b.c.),  the assigns  of  Min  and  Horus,  the  falcon  god,  were engaged.  Horus  was  seen  as  the  deity  of  the  southeastern Delta,  Min  was  the  deity  of  the  east  desert,  and the new god was visited Min-Horus, the guardian of mining dispatches into the Sinai.

During  the  pharaohs  investiture  solemnisation  in the  New  Kingdom  (1550-1069  b.c.),  an  elaborate advance and feast honored Min so that his virility would  be  passed  to  the  new  pharaoh.  The  festival is entered on the 2nd pylon of the Ramesseum, the mortuary temple of Ramses II (1279-1213 b.c.), and  besides  in the temple  of Ramses III at Medinet Habu in  Thebes,  which  shows  Ramses III  in  a  palanquin (carrying  chair)  leading  the  royal  palace  in  a  grand advancement to the temple. The statue of Min sits in his  shrine  and  is  carried  by  priests  with  long  poles over their shoulders that support the shrine. When they reach the public area, two priests holding a linen drapery hide the statue of Min from view while other priests  chant  anthems.  Then  the  tabby  appears  with the White Bull, an animal sacred to Min, and they idolize the kings antecedents before the investiture. Toward  the  end  of  the  solemnisation,  four  sparrows are set free to fly to the four corners of the land and herald  the  new  sovereign.  In  Thebes,  the  great god Amun was at various times linked with Min as well.